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Thread: African Martial arts.

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    Default African Martial arts.

    I notice in the African style section, there is a tread for Tahtib, an Egyptian martial art. However, The African continent is filled with lots of martial art tradtions. This post will serve To name and show examples of a few. Please add if you are aware of any and can provide info. It would be great to see the African style section grow, because from my research, I have found that martial arts in Africa are a big part of the people, but not much is known about them outside of Africa

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    Default Dambe

    Dambe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Dambe, also known as Kokawa is a form of boxing associated with the Hausa people of West Africa. Historically, Dambe included a wrestling component, known as Kokawa, but today it is essentially a striking art. The tradition is dominated by Hausa butcher caste groups, and over the last century evolved from clans of butchers traveling to farm villages at harvest time, integrating a fighting challenge by the outsiders into local harvest festival entertainment. It was also traditionally practised as a way for men to get ready for war, and many of the techniques and terminology allude to warfare. Today, companies of boxers travel, performing outdoor matches accompanied by ceremony and drumming, throughout the traditional Hausa homelands of northern Nigeria, southern Niger and southwestern Chad. The name "Dambe" derives from the Hausa word for "boxing", and appears in languages like Bole as Dembe. Boxers are called by the Hausa word "daæmaænga"

    **videos
    1.



    2.

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    Default The various tradtional African wrestling styles

    Africa is also filled with various traditoinal wrestling styles:

    Lutte Traditionnelle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Lutte Traditionnelle (fr. for Traditional Wrestling) is the name used to describe related styles of West African Folk wrestling, known as Laamb in Senegal, Boreh in The Gambia, Evala in Togo, and KoKowa / Kokawa in Hausa areas of Nigeria and Niger, or simply Lutte Traditionnelle, in Niger and Burkina Faso. International competition takes place during the Jeux de la Francophonie and the newly organised Championship of African Lutte Traditionnelle.

    **videos
    1.


    2.

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    Default Various African Stick Fighting Styles

    Also, there area various stick fighting styles throughout the continent of Africa, from Zulu stick fighting, to Nguni Stick fighting, to Suri Stick fighting and everything in between just to name a few. Some use two sticks, some one sticks, some long sticks, etc....

    Nguni stick fighting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Nguni stick fighting (also known as donga, or dlala 'nduku, which literally translates as playing sticks) is a martial art traditionally practiced by teenage Nguni herdboys in South Africa. Each combatant is armed with two long sticks, one of which is used for defense and the other for offense. Little armor is used.
    Although Nguni/ Xhosa styles of fighting may use only two sticks, variations of Bantu /Nguni stick fighting throughout Southern Africa incorporate shields as part of the stick fighting weaponry. Zulu stick fighting uses an "Isiquili" or attacking stick, an "Uboko" or defending stick and an "izoliHauw" or defending shield.

    **Videos
    1: Some Zulu Stick fighting



    2.nice video of Suri stick fighting of Ethiopia

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    Default Nuba Fighting

    Nuba fighting is done by people of the Kurdufan hill country of central Sudan, involving both stick fighting and wrestling .

    Nuba fighting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The goal of Nuba wrestling is to slam the opponent to the ground. Wrestling is relatively recreational, and serious injuries are rare.
    Nuba wrestling has no pinning and no submissions. Although there are strikes, these are essentially part of the grappling; in other words, this is not a boxing system, as is, for example, Hausa dambe. Therefore, Nuba wrestling is best viewed as a system of standing grappling, historically practiced naked, but in towns, today practiced in T-shirts and shorts.
    Nuba stick fighting essentially mimics the movements of fighting with spear and shield. Little armor is worn, so injuries can be severe.

    **Sorry I could find no good videos~

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    Default Engolo

    taken from: Engolo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Engolo, or NGolo (kikongo word meaning strength, power) refers to a public and private performance of ritual combat by various ethnic groups around the Cunene river in Southern Angola. The style of fighting involves various kicks, dodges, and leg sweeps, with an emphasis on inverted positions, i.e. with one or more hands on the ground. The first mention of Engolo in literature was made by Ablano Neves e Sousa in a set of drawings demonstrating various techniques and their similarities to the Afro-Brazilian art form of Capoeira in the 1960s. The NGolo is considered to be one of several African martial arts of the African Diaspora in the Americas. (See Kalunga, Kalunga Line))

    Neves e Sousa described the NGolo as part of a rite of passage, Omuhelo, between young boys vying for a bride in the contest, and whose techniques derived from the peculiar way in which Zebras fight amongst themselves. Research carried out by Dr. TJ Desch Obi finds that the NGolo itself is not strictly performed for any one ritual, but as an element in various public and private performances.

    In his book Fighting for Honor, as well as his article "Combat and Crossing of the Kalunga", Dr. Desch Obi draws parallels between the circle space used in the Engolo and the inverted techniques with the Kalunga Cosmology, in which the spirit–ancestor world is inverted as a world of opposites: Where men walk on their feet, the spirits walk on the their hands, where men are black, the spirits are white, where men reach their peak physical abilities in life, the ancestors reach their peak spirituality. He states that men in performing N'Golo with its inverted positions connect themselves physically and spiritually with the ancestors, and with specific ancestral warriors of the past.

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    Default Testa aka Riesy

    I can not find much on this system other than what I've found here, and read about in various books:

    Testa | Martial Arts Database

    Testa is an African, especially Eritrean and Ethiopian, martial art that emphasizes headbutting. Its basis is on real hand-to-hand combat techniques, although it is often practiced in the open as a dance.

    Testa or Riesy is an African martial art of brutal headbutting from Eritria. Its techniques also include kicks, hand strikes, parries, and grabs. Hand, foot, and grabbing techniques are very intricate and are solely used in order to strike the opponent with the “Big Knuckle”, or head. Biting and opponent in the groin and the windpipe are also allowed in competitions.

    The system as adapted by Dennis Newsome includes kicks, punches, and limited grappling, but the emphasis is on headbutting, with the other techniques being used mainly to set-up headbutts.

    It is not unusual for testa practitioners to use so called “dirty techniques” such as eye-gouging and biting, although these are not taught nor practiced in the open. In traditional Testa, there is a sole focus on trapping and headbutting. There is no known historical documentation pertaining to Testa, only techniques taught from generation to generation.

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    Default Other arts throughout Africa

    This and various other arts little known to the world, but thrive in various places throughout the continent of Africa. To top it off, here is a list that can pretty much be found all over the internet of various African martial arts, and the country of which it originates. But the truth is, this isn't even an inch of a portion of the iceberg's tip ;-)

    Please feel free to add, or comment and hopefully we can see the African style section get just a little bigger~

    Algeria
    -El Matreg
    A North African martial art most commonly practiced as entertainment in Algeria. In this, two players fight using long sticks – the idea is to score points by outwitting and out-maneuvering your opponent.

    Angola
    -Bassula
    This Angolan art's sole purpose is to immobilize the opponent. However, because of the high risk of injury, the modern objective is to only knock them down. A predecessor of Capoeira.

    -Gabetula
    An Angolan art that supposedly involved punching that later contributed to the art of Capoeira.

    -Kamangula
    An Angolan martial art and predecessor of Capoeira, this art is much like modern Slap Boxing, it consists of bash your opponent open-handed.

    -N'gola
    (or N’golo) An Angolan ritual martial art (used by the Bantu and Mucupis peoples) in which two males would fight in order to win a bride presented by the parents of the girl. The fight uses both hands and feet all to knock the opponent down. The winner would prove his bravery in order to recieve his wife. A predecessor of Capoeira.

    -Njinga
    An Angolan art that later contributed to the art of Capoeira.

    Congo
    -Gwindulumutu
    a head bashing style of martial arts from Congo

    -Kipura
    A martial art of Congo in which the fighting techniques are based on that of a rooster's. Believed to be an predecessor of Capoeira.

    -Mousondi
    a Martial art that later lead to the development of Kalenda.

    Egypt
    -Aha
    (a.k.a. Kemetic Aha, Ahah, Kemet Mariama) Aha is a tricky form of boxing and grappling practiced by the Kemites. According to some sorces, it was practiced exclusively by Kemetic priests.

    -Hikuta
    An ancient Egyptian boxing art still used today. The basis for Hikuta is the ancient art of Kuta. Today Hikuta is used for very modern reasons, mostly the defeat of criminals.

    -Kuta
    Kuta was initially developed by the bodyguards of the ancient Pharoahs in Egypt as the most efficient and effective way to defend their king. Kuta remained top secret amongst the Asian rulers for over a thousand years until military soldiers found out the secrets. Today Kuta is the basis for the art of Hikuta

    -Naboot
    Supposedly almost the same as Tahteeb, except that the fighters use longer staffs. *NOTE: Other sources say Naboot isn’t a martial art, but the name of the staff used in Tahteeb.

    -Nubian Wrestling
    Nuba wrestling, practiced for over 3,000 years, is one of the oldest forms of this ancient sport. The earliest known portrayal of Nubian wrestlers is found on a wall painting from the tomb of Tyanen, an Egyptian officer who died in 1410 B.C. While it is known that Egyptians recruited Nubian archers into their army, maybe this picture implies that Nubian wrestlers were also highly valued by the Egyptians. "Nubian" is a common term the Egyptians used to describe all brown- and black-skinned people living to the south. After studying the various wall paintings depicting Nubian wrestlers and comparing them to the myriad tribes in what is now modern-day Sudan, archaeologists, anthropologists, and historians have determined that the Nubas of southern Kordofan are most likely the descendants of the ancient Nubian wrestlers. Ancient Greek wrestling and Nuba wrestling are similar in style—the wrestlers are nude and score by takedowns (not pinning). These wrestlers can use their entire body, but modern Greco-Roman-style wrestling allows the competitors to use only their upper bodies for takedowns. Nuba wrestling, however, most likely predates Greek wrestling by several hundred years and has remained essentially unchanged for millennia.

    - Sebekkah
    A native grappling art of Egypt. According to one of our MartialTalk posters, Sebekkah requires much waist power in its movements.

    -Tahteeb
    Tahteeb is played mostly in the Northern regions of Egypt by tuff men young and old who enjoy the challenge of a good fight, also it is a great way to show machismo and rack up potential brides. Like Surma stickfighting of southern Sudan, Tahteeb is played only by men and can get very bloody when two opponents do not particularly like one another. When Tahteeb is played nicely one man will attack and the other will only defend and then vice versa, but when men do not like each other and they play together suddenly the rules change and the real rules are announced, there are no rules. Due to the fullcontact aspect of Tahteeb, parrying and blocking are essentials to survival when playing the game, striking is the norm and joint locking is almost unheard off.

    -Ta-Merrian
    An Egyptian martial art that is based on totem animal movements and spirit dances.


    Eritrea
    -Testa
    Testa, or Riesy, is a brutal Eritrean headbutting art. It may also include kicks, hand strikes, parries, grabs, etc. Hand, foot, and grabbing techniques are very intricate and are solely used in order to strike the opponent with the “Big Knuckle”, or head. A Testaman may even bite the opponent’s windpipe or groin out of pure desperation.

    Ethiopia
    -Dula Meketa
    the stick fighting art of the Oromo people of Ethiopia

    -Re-Efi-Areh-Ehsee
    An Ethiopian martial art that is used as a way to convey cultural identity through a fighting system.

    -Surma
    or Donga Stick Fighting, is a test of nerves and brute strength. The Donga of Ethiopia is fought to prove masculinity, settle personal vendettas, and most importantly, to win wives. The 50 or more men who participate in each tournament represent different villages. The contestants fight in heats, with the winners going on to the next round until the competition narrows to two finalists. The winner of the last bout wins the entire contest

    Gambia
    -Borey
    Borey is from the Gambia it is a grappling art of the Mandiga; it consists of knees, headbutts, kicks and holds to break the neck, leg, collar bone and arm. There is a similar art in Senegal called Laamb.

    -Gambian Wresting
    Gambian Wrestling is an African martial art that is a deep-seated tradition and national sport. The warriors wear loincloths called "Juju's" and strut, dance, spar, and brag in challenge of noisy support from the drums. The fight continues until a contestant is brought to the ground. Punching, kicking, spitting and flinging sand in the eyes is all legal. After sundown, the atmosphere builds with excitment as the champions come out to fight. Note: May be the same as Borey.

    Guinea
    - Peul
    A martial art of Guinea

    Kenya
    -Kayti
    Arguably the first of all weapon-based martial arts, Kayti represents the origins of all weaponry. Though centered in Africa (primarily Kenya), the roots come from all over Africa. Kayti is the predecessor to modern swordplay (from China) and the better known Islamic Kali (from Philippines).

    -Massaï
    The fighting techniques and disciplines of the Masai people of Kenya

    Madagascar
    -Morengy
    The traditional boxing martial art of Madagascar

    Morocco
    - Maratabeen
    An Arab martial art of Morocco

    Nigeria
    -Dambe
    Dambe, or Hausa Boxing, is a fist fighting system from Nigeria consisting of kicks, punches, knees and headbutts. Dambe is a savage method of empty hand combat and a testament to the creativity of African warriors.

    -Gidigbo
    A kind of Wrestling practiced by the Yoruba of Western Nigeria

    -Igba Magba
    A martial art native to Nigeria

    -Korokoro
    A ritual martial art intertwined with the Korokoro dance of Nigeria.

    Réunion
    -Moringue
    A stick fighting art of Réunion.

    Senegal
    -Béri
    A native style of wrestling from Senegal

    -Borey
    The art of Borey is also native to Senegal, and (in the Senegal style) consists of punching, kicking, headbutting, grappling, and joint locks

    -Dioula
    a native martial art of Senegal

    -Laamb
    Laamb (a.k.a. "Senegalese wrestling") is a wrestling art that takes place in Senegal. Before the event the beating of the drums along with the mellow voices of the singers will alert everyone that it's about to start. The crowd would gather around a sandy pit and watch several bouts before the final bout of 2 champions. The fighters would wear "wrappers" around their waist, which would be provided by their fiances or female relatives, and the rest of their body will be naked. The winner must knock his opponent's knees, shoulder, or back to the sand. Strikes and slaps are allowed nowadays.

    -Mkazo Ncha Shikana
    African pressure point grappling. Most commonly practiced in Senegal.

    - N’oboro
    A stick fighting art from Senegal

    -Olva
    A native style of wrestling from Senegal

    South Africa
    -Isinaphakade Samathongo
    an ancestral esoteric warrior system practiced by the Zulu and Xhosa tribes of South Africa. The system emphasizes strong combative techniques and ethical philosophy. It is used as an initiation into the “warrior-priest caste” of the two tribes.

    -Musangwa
    A martial art of South Africa. It consists of punching, headbutting, earslaps, and knees.

    -Nguni Stick Fighting
    Stick-fighting in Nguni-speaking areas of South Africa has an educational role, it teaches young members of society social values, gender roles, the worthy nature and respectability of physical endeavors. Zulu and Xhosa boys begin learning at an early age the utilitarian function of sport, sharpening physical skills and mental attitudes necessary for hunting game and combat. The rise of stick-fighting as a physical contest created a stage for young boys to assert themselves within a specific age-group, achieve a social identity in competition with others, and, possibly, achieve a degree of 'independence' unavailable to the common person.

    -Zulu Stick Fighting
    (or Zulu Impi) Long past its days of glory, stick fighting is no longer a common practice among the Zulu people, and practitioners struggle to validate its existence in these days of political turmoil, acculturation, and modernisation. Nonetheless, stick fighting appears to assist in upholding the traditional social system by perpetuating socially accepted modes of male behaviour and ideals. Stick fighting, as a cultural tradition, therefore continues to fulfil its traditional didactic function in some Zulu communities.

    Sudan
    -Nuba Stick Fighting
    Rarely practiced today, traditional Nuba Stick fights are most commonly practiced among the Moro tribe. The stick-fighting is a contest conducted by, as the name indicates, a stick and a shield between two contestants, This sport is always carried out at the end of autumn and the beginning of harvest, and it is completely forbidden during the cultivation season, in case it puts the youths off their work. Stick fighting is part of the ceremonies that follow the harvest, in which thanks is given to God for providing a good harvest. It is embedded in the spiritual traditions of the people.

    -Nuba Wrestling
    The ancestor of the ancient Nubian Wrestling; practiced by the Nuba tribe. “Wrestling is more than just a sport to the Nubas—it is a seminal part of their culture with both social and religious purposes. Boys prepare for manhood through wrestling competitions. Successful wrestlers achieve a higher status that follows them through life. Wrestling also has connections with fertility rites, ancestral worship, and animistic beliefs. It is so intertwined with all aspects of Nuba culture, it is feared that if the Nuba were to lose wrestling, it might cause them to lose other customs.”- National Geographic

    -Toubata
    A native wrestling art of Sudan

    Togo
    -Evala
    Evala is a wrestling sport practiced by the Kabye people of northern Togo. In wrestling competitions, boys try to prove there manhood by winning an Evala wrestling match and is used as an intiation ceremony

    -Zvaha
    A native wrestling martial art of Togo

    Unknown Country of Origin
    -Yuna Onse
    An art that is very similar to Capoeira, as it is one of its many predecessors

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    Default

    An article in the NY Times today about laamb:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/25/sp...it_th_20120525

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    Default

    Chaleira, thanks for providing this informative thread.

    I think all these African styles that you have mentioned should be included in the styles database

    Once the website is updated (very soon now), I will work on getting all these included into that section.
    Contribute to the martial arts styles database.
    Is your school listed in our martial arts schools directory?

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